Research

Current and Recent Research

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Current research

Developing an Australian-first recovery model for parents in Vic mental health and family services

Understanding resilience and experiences of separation in same-sex parented families

Recently completed research

Becoming Somebody: A constructivist grounded theory of marginalised young people re-engaging with education through an alternative school

How do drug service workers in the field of Aboriginal substance misuse describe the experience of being trained as family therapists and using family therapy in their work?

Finding hope in our back pockets: Therapists working together in an action research co-operative inquiry to develop best practice with families who have experienced sibling sexual abuse

Work, Love, Play: Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families

Family work with families who have experienced trauma

Evaluation of the Family-to-Family Link Up Program

Improving clinicians’ involvement with families in an aged person’s mental health service

Evaluation of the implementation of Single Session Work in Family Therapy

Farm Gate: Researching the Campaspe model of rural engagement

Collaborative action research, support and training project with Victorian Drought Counsellors

A process evaluation of the Building Family Skills Together (BFST) Initiative

The implementation of Single Session Work (SSW) in Community Health


Current research

Developing an Australian-first recovery model for parents in Vic mental health and family services

This four year research collaboration focuses on the development and trial of a Recovery model for parents with major mental health problems, which addresses parenting as a central component of their treatment. An internationally renowned parent empowerment intervention, Let’s Talk About Children, will be adapted and piloted in Adult Mental Health, Community Managed Mental Health, and family services across Victoria.  The impact of this Recovery model on children’s wellbeing, family functioning, parenting and recovery will be measured as part of the study. The research will also aim to improve understanding of how evidence based practices can be integrated in complex service environments. Research design - qualitative interviews; randomised control trials, with wait list control; agency case studies; and economic evaluation.

Date Commenced: March, 2013

Researchers: A/Professor Darryl Maybery (Monash University, lead agency), Dr Andrea Reupert (Monash University), Dr Jade Sheen (Monash), Brendan O’Hanlon (The Bouverie Centre), Rose Cuff (The Bouverie Centre) Melinda Goodyear (Monash University), Warren Cann (The Parenting Research Centre), and Dr. Kim Dalziel (University of South Australia)

Sponsored by: Mental Illness Research Fund

Progress: Work commenced on this project in July 2013 and will continue until 2017. Updates will be provided at regular intervals.

Output: N/A

Related links: N/A

Contact: Brendan O'Hanlon at b.ohanlon@latrobe.edu.au

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Understanding resilience and experiences of separation in same-sex parented families

There is a paucity of research on the separation experiences of same-sex couples, especially those who have children together. As increasing numbers of same-sex couples enter into parenthood, there is a need to understand more about how these parents and their children cope in cases of parental separation, including the influence of current laws relating to same-sex parents and ways in which these parents negotiate mainstream institutions such as the family court. This study will conduct face-to-face interviews with separated parents who have had children whilst within a same-sex relationship.

Researcher: Luke Benjamin Gahan

Date commenced PhD research: June 2011

Progress: As of December 2012, 19 people had participated in interviews - 18 females and 1 male – in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, as well as in regional and rural Victoria. In February the study travels to Adelaide, South Australia to interview 6 more people. We are very keen to increase the number of males in the study and would like to hear from any separated same-sex parented males.

Output: 

The Australian Sociological Association Annual Conference: ‘Challenging Identities, Institutions and Communities’, University of South Australia, 24-27 November 2014. (Paper Presentation) ‘“Our kids have enough f****ing parents in their life”: Negotiating post separation parenting within same-sex parented families of 3 or more parents’. (Accepted)

LGBTI Health Alliance 8th National LGBTI Health Conference, 'Our Bodies, Our Minds - Health In Difference’, Melbourne Australia, 18-20 April 2013. (Paper Presentation) ‘Separated same-sex parented families: (In)equality, isolation and resilience’.

International Sociological Association Seminar of the Research Committee on Family Research, ‘Demographic and Institutional Change in Global Families’, Academia Sinica, Tapei Taiwan, 28-30 March 2013. (Poster Presentation) ‘Understanding resilience and experiences of separation in same-sex parented families 理解同性伴侶家庭解組的復原力和經驗’

The Australian Sociological Association Annual Conference: ‘Enduring and Emerging Inequalities’, University of Queensland, 27-29 November 2012. (Paper Presentation) ‘Understanding resilience and experiences of separation in same-sex parented families: Preliminary Findings’.

Related website links:

Contact: Luke Gahan at lbgahan@students.latrobe.edu.au

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Improving clinicians’ involvement with families in an aged person’s mental health service

This project used a participatory action research framework within Eastern Health Aged Persons’ Mental Health Service (EH APMHS) community teams to explore ways of enhancing staff-family contact and better understand barriers to team members engaging and working more closely with families of patients treated by EH APMHS. Attitudes towards working with families as well as perceived competencies were also studied. The project aimed to clarify the barriers to staff members working with patients’ families, to develop and describe some appropriate interventions to overcome these barriers, and to evaluate the effectiveness of these interventions.

Date Commenced: 2009

Researchers: Pam Rycroft (The Bouverie Centre); Pam Copperwaite (Student on Placement, The Bouverie Centre)

Consultants: Dr. Kuruvilla George (Eastern Health Aged Persons Mental Health Service); Dr. Tess Knight (Deakin University); Dr. Amaryll Perlesz (The Bouverie Centre, Latrobe University)

Sponsored by: Jointly funded by the Eastern Health Aged Persons’ Mental Health Service and The Bouverie Centre

Progress: The formal aspects of the research have now concluded. To date, the project has achieved the following:

  • Twenty-nine interviews were carried out with community team staff members about their experiences of working with families. Transcripts of the interviews were coded and themes extracted, with the results of this process presented to staff at EH APMHS for verification.
  • A two-day training series was developed and delivered to two separate cohorts of staff involved in the project.
  • Training participants filled in a questionnaire about their current practice and attitudes towards working with families prior to commencement of training and then 12 months later. The data from Time 1 and Time 2 has yet to be compared.
  • Eight lead clinicians within the service attended an extra day of training, and monthly support meetings facilitated by Pam Rycroft to support their ongoing efforts to promote family inclusive practice within their various teams. At the conclusion of the 12 month period, this group expressed an interest in continuing to meet and support each other as peers.
  • The process and results were written up and an article published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy.

Output: Journal paper

Hudgson,C. Rycroft, P., & Giri, S. (2012). ‘I'm not a family therapist. OK?’ Working Constructively with Families in Aged Psychiatry. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 33, pp 321-330. doi:10.1017/aft.2012.40.

Related links: N/A

Contact: Pam Rycroft at p.rycroft@latrobe.edu.au

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Recently completed research

Becoming Somebody: A constructivist grounded theory of marginalised young people re-engaging with education through an alternative school

This research involved an examination of the experiences of educational disengagement and re-engagement among young people attending an alternative school. The findings of this study revealed that the school’s social justice approach was key to students’ re-engagement. Outcomes of re-engaging that mattered to students included their increased sense of social inclusion, and hope for the future.

Researcher: Carmel Hobbs

Date PhD commenced: February 2011

Progress: Carmel submitted her thesis for examination in February 2017

Output:

Published papers

Hobbs, C., & Power, J. (2013). Engaging disadvantaged young people in alternative education: The importance of staff/student relationships. Journal of Educational Leadership in Action, (2)1.

Conference Presentations

“Building hope for a positive future” – Doing School Differently, Melbourne, September 2016.

“Building hope for a positive future: ‘I’m doing something with my life’” (poster) – La Trobe University Research Showcase, September 2016.

“Research with marginalised young people” – School of Psychology and Public Health Postgraduate seminar, October 2015.

“Who’s in and who’s out: Why inclusion matters – a focus on the methods aspect of this research project” – Presentation to La Trobe University Hallmark students in the subject HMK2COR: The craft of research, September 2014.

“Strategies for engaging young people in research” – Association for Qualitative Research, Melbourne, November 2013.

“Understanding the dynamics of student achievement” – Chicago International Conference on Education, Chicago, June 2013.

“Exploring the experiences of young people and their families engagement with an alternative model of education” – Higher Degree Research Festival, La Trobe University, Melbourne, November 2012.

“A cool school? Preliminary findings from an online questionnaire with students attending an alternative school in Melbourne” – Access and Achievement Forum, La Trobe University, Melbourne, October 2012. Related website links: http://www.latrobe.edu.au/she/staff/profile?uname=chobbs https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Carmel_Hobbs

Contact: Carmel Hobbs at c.hobbs@latrobe.edu.au


How do drug service workers in the field of Aboriginal substance misuse describe the experience of being trained as family therapists and using family therapy in their work?

There is a growing recognition that culturally congruent approaches in the area of Indigenous health and education are needed. However, there are few detailed accounts of what factors contribute to providing sufficient cultural safety so that services are accessible and able to provide effective interventions. This qualitative research makes a significant contribution to these areas of inquiry through exploring the contribution of family therapy and family therapy training to those working in the field of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander substance misuse. Workers, often at odds with mainstream interventions found that family therapy could provide a culturally relevant means of approaching Aboriginal substance misuse through its contextual and relational view of problems. Important to the engagement of the drug service workers with family therapy as a modality was the processes by which it was imparted. The training utilised a powerful pedagogical approach that provided a corrective educational experience for many of the participants. This work will be of interest to all those seeking strategies to `close the gap' in the fields of health, education and research.

Date commenced: October 2009

Researcher: Dr. Jacqui Sundbery (The Bouverie Centre)

Sponsored by: La Trobe University Postgraduate Research Scholarship and The Bouverie Centre.

Progress: This work was completed Jan 2015

Output:

Book
Aboriginal Drug Service Workers' Experience of Family Therapy: Training and Practice. LAP Lambert Academic Publishing (2016-09-10)

Newsletter article
How Family Therapy is Making a Difference for Indigenous AOD Workers. Co-authored with Francie Boundy, Di Griffin. Drug Info, May 2012. Australian Drug Foundation.

Report
Family Therapy Training and Support for Aboriginal Mental Health and AOD Workers Working with At Risk Families in Aboriginal Community Settings - ‘The Metro Cohort’. Co-authored with Fiona McIllwaine, Jana Kelly - The Bouverie Centre, La Trobe University.

Journal paper
Empowering Indigenous Family Workers by Degree. Co-authored with Dr Kerry Proctor and Robyne Latham - The Bouverie Centre, La Trobe University. Australian Philanthropy, Dec 2011, Issue 80.

Contact: Dr. Jacqui Sundbery at J.Sundbery@latrobe.edu.au


Finding hope in our back pockets: Therapists working together in an action research co-operative inquiry to develop best practice with families who have experienced sibling sexual abuse

This research successfully contributed to deepening an understanding of how therapists make sense of, speak about, work with and are challenged by sibling sexual abuse (SSA). It also identified the importance of compassion satisfaction and the idea of hope in sustaining therapists whilst they undertake such challenging work. Key findings and recommendations for working with SSA were made in regard to the use of a collaborative approach with both colleagues and families, the use of clear, non-judgemental language that recognises the impact of SSA on victims and assists the young person who perpetrated the abuse to be accountable, whilst remaining aware of and balancing the different perspectives, understandings and therapeutic needs of all family members. Recommendations regarding the support of therapists included the importance of space and time to think about the work and its impact on therapists and of bringing hope into the therapist’s frame of reference. This action research has also led to a number of conference papers, the development of seminars and workshops to develop therapists’ understanding of and skills in working with SSA, scholarly contributions to journals and consultations to therapists both within and outside the sexual assault sector.

Date PhD research commenced: 2007

Progress: Thesis submitted November 2014

Output: Aspects of the work have been presented in a range of professional contexts, including one of the Keynote presentations at the 2017 Australian Psychologists and Counsellors in Schools National Conference. An interview by Cindy Tarczon, Australian Centre for the Study of Sexual Assault, was also conducted in 2012.

Related website links: Interview with Cindy Tarczon

Contact: Helen Kambouridis at helen.kambouridis@rch.org.au


Work, Love, Play: Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families

The Work, Love, Play (WLP) project is a longitudinal study of families parented by same-sex attracted couples and single parents. The study began in 2008 and concluded in 2014. It focused on issues such as parental health and wellbeing, parents’ sense of connection to extended families and communities, household division of labour and work/life balance, experiences of discrimination, and talking to children about conception and non-traditional families. In addition, there were two side-projects linked to the study. One which explored same-sex attracted parents’ experiences of separation and another which explored parents’ experiences with mainstream health and welfare service providers.

Date commenced: 2008

Researchers: Adjunct Professor Amaryll Perlesz (The Bouverie Centre, La Trobe University), Dr. Jennifer Power (The Bouverie Centre, La Trobe University), Rhonda Brown (Nursing, Deakin University), Professor Marian Pitts (Australian Research Centre for Sex, Health and Society), Professor Margot Schofield (School of Public Health, La Trobe University), Associate Professor Ruth McNair (Department of General Practice, University of Melbourne), Dr. Andrew Bickerdike (Relationships Australia Victoria), and Luke Gahan (PhD candidate, The Bouverie Centre, La Trobe University)

Sponsored by: The study was funded by the Australian Research Council, Relationships Australia (National and Victorian branch), VicHealth (the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation) and ACON (formerly the AIDS Council of NSW) with generous in-kind support from Gay and Lesbian Health Victoria and the Queensland Association for Healthy Communities.

Progress: This project is complete. For less formal information about Work, Love & Play, you can follow the Work, Love & Play blog.

Output: 

Guidelines for providers working with same-sex parented families
These guidelines are designed to assist healthcare, welfare and counselling practitioners working in the community, clinical, hospital and counselling settings to provide inclusive and sensitive care to same-sex attracted parents and their children, and to prospective parents. For more information about these guidelines, or to order hardcopies, contact The Bouverie Centre.

Work, Love, Play: Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: Brief report 2014

Published papers:

von Doussa, H., Power, J., McNair, R., Brown, R., Schofield, M., Perlesz, A., Pitts, M., & Bickerdike, A. (2015). Building healthcare workers' confidence to work with same-sex parented families. Health Promotion International, 31(2), 459-469.

Power, Jennifer, Perlesz, Amaryll, McNair, Ruth, Schofield, Margot, Pitts, Marian, Brown, Rhonda Bickerdike, Andrew. (2012). Gay and bisexual dads and diversity: fathers in the Work, Love, Play study. Journal of Family Studies, 18(2-3), 143-154.

Power, Jennifer, Perlesz, Amaryll, Brown, Rhonda, Schofield, Margot, Pitts, Marian, McNair, Ruth, Bickerdike, Andrew. (2012). Bisexual parents and family diversity: findings from the Work, Love, Play study. Journal of Bisexuality, 12(4), 519-538.

Perlesz, Amaryll, Power, Jennifer, Brown, Rhonda, McNair, Ruth, Schofield, Margot, Pitts, Marian, Barrett, Anna, Bickerdike, Andrew. (2010). Organising work and home in same-sex parented families: findings from the Work Love Play study, Australian New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 31(4), pp374-391

Power, Jennifer, Perlesz, Amaryll, Brown, Rhonda, Schofield, Margot, Pitts, Marian, Mcnair, Ruth and Bickerdike, Andrew. (2010). Diversity, Tradition and Family: Australian Same-sex Attracted Parents and Their Families. Gay & Lesbian Issues and Psychology Review, 6(2), 66-81.

Power, Jennifer, Perlesz, Amaryll, Schofield, Margot, Pitts, Marian, Brown, Rhonda, Mcnair, Ruth, Barrett, Anna and Bickerdike, Andrew. (2010). Understanding resilience in same-sex parented families: the work, love, play study. BMC Public Health 10(115): http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/10/115

Related links: Work, Love & Play Blog

Contact: Dr Jennifer Power at jennifer.power@latrobe.edu.au

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Family work with families who have experienced trauma

This project aimed to explore the ways in which experiences of trauma impacts upon families, the ways in which workers in adult health services can assist individuals and families to manage trauma and the ways trauma-informed family work can be incorporated into practice across the health and welfare sector. The project involved a series of interviews with therapists working with traumatised families and consultation with workers across the health and welfare sector to explore issues of trauma.

Date commenced: July, 2012

Researchers: Dr Jennifer Power, Henry von Doussa, Dr Melinda Goodyear and Julie Beauchamp; The Bouverie Centre.

Sponsored by: The project was funded under the Federal Government’s (FaHCSIA) Child Aware Approaches Program, which is part of the Government’s Second Action Plan and falls under The National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children 2009–2020.

Progress: This project is complete. To read about project’s the findings, download the 2013 report here

Output:

Practice Guidelines for Trauma-informed Family Sensitive Practice in Adult Health Services
These guidelines are designed for people working in adult health and welfare services across a range of sectors, especially; alcohol and other drug, mental health, family violence, and sexual abuse/child protection, although they could have broader appeal for use in other sectors where families experience trauma, such as the acquired brain injury sector.

Related links: N/A

Contact: Dr Jennifer Power at jennifer.power@latrobe.edu.au or Henry von Doussa at h.vonDoussa@latrobe.edu.au

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Evaluation of the Family-to-Family Link Up Program

A co-operative inquiry action research methodology was used to provide insights into the development and implementation of a pilot program, Family to Family Link Up. This program was implemented within community acquired brain injury (ABI) metropolitan and regional service networks. The research explored the value of supporting families struggling to adjust to family life following ABI through meeting with others in similar circumstances. The Family to Family Link Up program sought to redress a lack in the number of peer support programs not only for individuals with an ABI but for all family members by offering individual families an opportunity to meet with another family for 90 minutes to two hours in a session (or Link Up) facilitated by a trained worker. Some families met more than once depending on their need and the capacity of agency to provide additional Link Up services. During Link Ups families typically shared information regarding brain injury and community resources, similarities and differences in the impact of ABI on their family, and what has helped/helps family members deal with the challenges associated with ABI.

Date commenced: July, 2010

Researchers: Franca Butera-Prinzi (The Bouverie Centre), Nella Charles (The Bouverie Centre), Kate Heine (Young Men’s Christian Association, YMCA), Brenda Rutherford (Ballarat Health Service) and Diane Lattin (Disability Services, Southern Health)

Sponsored by: Maddocks Foundation & Department of Human Services, Disability Services

Progress: Evaluation of the pilot has now concluded. Forty-six families participated in the program, 13 from regional Victoria and 33 from metropolitan Melbourne. A total of 96 individual family members took part in 25 Link Ups conducted over a 12 month period. These Link Ups were facilitated by seven different workers, two from regional Victoria and five from metropolitan Melbourne. Analysis of qualitative and quantitative data collected from families and facilitators about the effectiveness of the program and experiences of each session suggests the program was well received by both cohorts, and that the opportunity to meet others in brief, time-limited contacts with a trained facilitator is a useful and needed addition to the range of supports available to families caring for a member with an ABI. As well as the benefits of the program, the evaluation provided useful feedback on implementation issues and constraints.

Output: Published paper

Butera-Prinzi, F., Charles, N., Heine, K., Rutherford, B., & Lattin, D. (2010) Family-to Family Link Up Program: A community-based initiative supporting families caring for someone with an acquired brain injury, NeuroRehabilitation, 27, pp31-47

Related links: N/A

Contact: Franca Butera-Prinzi at f.butera-prinzi@latrobe.edu.au

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Evaluation of the implementation of Single Session Work in Family Therapy

This project used an action research framework to evaluate the implementation of single session work (SSW; otherwise known as single session therapy) as our main model of service delivery at The Bouverie Centre. As part of the evaluation we documented client and therapist experiences of the change in the way we delivered our services for a period of 12 months. Therapists participated in monthly cooperative inquiry groups in which they explored and developed their clinical practice of SSW. Clients completed the Pre and Post SSW Questionnaire, and completed an end of session SSW Client Evaluation.

A follow-up study of clients was conducted between January and June 2012. This study sought to explore whether there was any correlation between therapists' concerns about SSW and client's experiences of SSW. Twenty-four clients agreed to participate in phone interviews in which they were asked about their experience of attending our single session family therapy service.

Date commenced: November, 2009

Researchers: Imogen O'Neill, Naomi Rottem and Bouverie clinical program staff

Sponsored by: The Bouverie Centre

Progress: Staff and client evaluation completed June 2011. Follow-up study completed September 2012.

This evaluation of a 12 month trial of SSW found, similar to other studies, that nearly two thirds of families chose to attend for one or two sessions, and that most were satisfied with the service they received. Therapists raised a number of clinical dilemmas about SSW including: the importance of attending to the language of single session work so that clients are aware that more sessions are always available; the challenges of incorporating paperwork into clinical practice; and the benefits of the single session framework as a way of staying on track and keeping focused on clients' goals.

Follow-up interviews revealed a small number of clients had some initial concerns about perceived limitations of service availability (i.e. one session) however this was no longer a concern once they met and spoke with the therapist. A similar number noted a positive perception of the idea of SSW.

Output:

Published paper
O'Neill, I & Rottem, N. (2012). Reflections and Learning from an Agency-Wide Implementation of Single Session Work in Family Therapy. ANZJFT, 33(1), 70-83

Conference Presentation
31st Australian Family Therapy Conference: Diversity: Context, Culture and Community. Melbourne, October, 2010.

Related links:  N/A

Contact: Naomi Rottem at N.Rottem@latrobe.edu.au

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Farm Gate: Researching the Campaspe model of rural engagement

In 2006, Campaspe Primary Care Partnership (PCP) member agencies, which included local health services and other members of the Shire of Campaspe’s Drought Social Recovery Committee, agreed to apply a consistent and collaborative approach to support farming families within the Campaspe Shire area. The outcome was the development of a coordinated approach termed the Farm Gate Pathway Model, which arose from an initial pilot of cold calling undertaken in 2005-06. Early reports had revealed a promising uptake of both practical and psychological supports made available and, as a result, Cold calling became a key drought response practice in the Campaspe Shire.

Given the difficulties reported in engaging rural people affected by drought in counselling, The Bouverie Centre was invited to help evaluate and understand this model better.

Date commenced: 2007

Researchers: Elena Tauridsky, Shane Weir, Dr Jeff Young and Carmel Hobbs; The Bouverie Centre

Sponsored by: Campaspe Primary Care Partnership (PCP)

Progress: This qualitative study, examining the experiences of farmers visited by representatives of the Campaspe Primary Care Partnership, and of the workers who undertook this assertive outreach, concluded in 2009.

Output: Farm Gate Cold Calling Evaluation Report

Related links: N/A

Contact: Dr Jeff Young at j.young@latrobe.edu.au

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Collaborative action research, support and training project with Victorian Drought Counsellors

Rural drought affected people are often seen as reluctant to seek counselling support despite experiencing major emotional stress, at times resulting in suicide. Traditional counselling approaches have struggled to engage this population and calls for the service system’s response to drought to be more coordinated have not been translated into action. Towards the end of 2006, The Bouverie Centre was funded to provide training and support for state-funded Drought Counsellors to develop approaches that work for rural people. Cooperative Inquiry Groups (CIGs) were formed in the Loddon Mallee, Grampians, Hume, Gippsland and Barwon regions to help Drought Counsellors promote, conceptualise and document successful strategies. Over 100 Drought Counsellors and workers from over 88 different organisations participated in over 170 hours of CIG research. Supported by additional evaluations and quantitative research tools, the CIG action research addressed the question: What are effective counselling and community development strategies for supporting people in drought affected rural communities?

Date commenced: 2006

Researchers: Jeff Young, Carmel Hobbs, Amaryll Perlesz, Judy Poll, Kerry Proctor, Colin Riess, Pam Rycroft, Elena Tauridsky, Shane Weir, Tina Whittle and Michelle Wills; The Bouverie Centre.

Sponsored by: Victorian Department of Human Services

Progress: Documentation of the work of the Victorian drought counsellors, their colleagues and clients concluded September in 2008.

Output:

Summary Report
This is a shorter version of the full project report, seeks to make the findings of the comprehensive research project more accessible, thus helping inform not only future drought responses, but also other challenges faced by rural communities

Full Report
The full report contains the research tools used to collect the data, provides detailed data upon which the key learnings and recommendations outlined in this summary are based.

Newsletters

Related links: N/A

Contact: Dr Jeff Young at j.young@latrobe.edu.au

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A process evaluation of the Building Family Skills Together (BFST) Initiative

Family interventions are effective in reducing relapse for people suffering from schizophrenia and reducing distress for family members, yet they are rarely provided in routine care in public mental health services. BFST was a two year project that researched the implementation of an evidence-based family intervention, Behavioural Family Therapy (BFT), in the continuing care teams of an adult mental health service. A unique feature of BFST was embedding a specialist practice facilitator in the service called a Family Practice Consultant.

Date commenced: 2006

Researchers: Brendan O’Hanlon (The Bouverie Centre), Amaryll Perlesz (The Bouverie Centre), Colin Riess (The Bouverie Centre), Peter McKenzie (The Bouverie Centre), Carol Harvey (University of Melbourne / North Western Mental Health)

Sponsored by: Partially funded by the DHS Mental Health

Progress: The study has concluded. The major learning from the project is described within an implementation framework. This reveals factors that both constrained and enabled the use of BFT; operating at the levels of the families, the practice model, the practitioners, the organisation and the implementation strategy employed. The intensive implementation support provided as part of BFST did not lead to an overall increase in the level of uptake of BFT compared to other studies but may have resulted in more of those trained in BFT using the model in practice. Six years after its introduction, BFT continues to be practiced within the continuing care teams who were part of the project and has been adopted within another program of the same service.

Key findings that have informed subsequent implementation projects:

Increasing implementation support will not necessarily lead to an increase in uptake of a new practice

The viability of embedding a specialist practice facilitator in an individual service as an implementation strategy requires further consideration. The embedding of such a role in a pilot site may be a useful preparatory stage in a multi-site implementation endeavor by providing detailed information about likely barriers and enablers to uptake

The setting and monitoring of uptake targets is critical to successful implementation and sustainability of new practice models. These targets need to be informed by a complex range of factors including client population and demographics, existing practitioner roles and organisational features including workload and staff turnover

Co-working and the identification and promotion of internal practice champions appear to be useful strategies for promoting the uptake of family based interventions

Output: Published paper

Harvey, C., & O'Hanlon, B. (2013). Family psycho-education for people with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders and their families. Published online 7 February 2013 Aust N Z J Psychiatry.

Related links: N/A

Contact: Brendan O'Hanlon at b.ohanlon@latrobe.edu.au 

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The implementation of Single Session Work (SSW) in Community Health

In 2004, the Department of Human Services (DHS) sponsored training in Single Session Work (SSW) for community health counsellors across Victoria. Traditionally, training to community health clinicians has been approved as a one-off enterprise without resources for further sector consultation. DHS approved funding for this research project in response to the positive reception from the sector to the SSW training and the unique support provided for SSW implementation. Funding was provided to understand and document SSW implementation in the community health sector. The research looked at:

  • Quantifying the level of implementation
  • Documenting successful implementation practices
  • Attempting to understand the factors that promoted or inhibited implementation
  • Investigating the impact of implementation


Date commenced: 2006

Researchers: Shane Weir, Michelle Wills, Dr Jeff Young, and Dr. Amaryll Perlesz; The Bouverie Centre.

Sponsored by: Primary Health Branch, Rural and Regional Health and Aged Care Services Division, Department of Human Services.

Progress: The research concluded in 2008.

Output: The Implementation of Single Session Work in Community Health

Related links: N/A

Contact: Naomi Rottem at n.rottem@latrobe.edu.au

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News

The 2017 Bouverie Alumni and Friends Celebration

Join us as we commemorate the importance of learning and education with guest speaker, John Marsden, writer, teacher and principal of Candlebark School and alumna speaker, Leonie Farrugia.

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News

Aboriginal Family Therapy Training Program: Evaluation & Impact

The Bouverie Centre's Indigenous Team recently developed an Evidence Brief and Impact Analysis Report on The Bouverie Centre's Aboriginal Family Therapy Training Program.

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